Quick Contact Numbers

Main City Number
(386) 986-3700
Customer Service
(386) 986-2360

Animal Control
(386) 986-2520
Building Insp. & Permits
(386) 986-3780
Business Tax Office
(386) 986-3766
Code Enforcement
(386) 986-3764
Communications & Marketing
(386) 986-3708
Finance
(386) 986-3723
Human Resources
(386) 986-3718
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(386) 986-2300
Purchasing
(386) 986-3730
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(386) 986-2323

Flagler County Info Line
(386) 313-4111
Flagler County Sheriff
(386) 437-4116

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This page was printed from : http://www.palmcoastgov.com/tv/about

About PCTV

Charter-Spectrum Channel 495
AT&T U-verse Channel 99

Channel Description

Palm Coast Television is a cable TV channel that provides non-commercial government and educational programming 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to Bright House Networks subscribers in Flagler County as part of their basic cable service on Channel 495.

Mission

The mission of PCTV is to serve the people of Flagler County by providing quality television programming and services that:

  • Makes government more accessible and understandable.
  • Educates children and adults.
  • Fosters citizen involvement and interaction in their community.

In short, PCTV will utilize television as a conduit to distribute information and to educate.

General Operational Policies

PCTV is not a public access channel; therefore channel resources and airtime, to achieve its mission and benefit the community, are restricted to government and educational use only. Appropriate programming will in general include the following:

  • Coverage of government meetings.
  • Airtime for pre-produced government and educational programs.
  • Video bulletin board to display useful information to the community.
  • Production of original, local interest programming such as group discussions, magazine programs, and documentaries as relevant to and connected with government and education.
  • Information on local government services
  • Explanations of the function of government
  • General information to the public about meetings and government-sponsored events
  • Emergency and public safety information
  • General announcements of government entities
  • Program coverage of government events, such as facility openings, recreational and cultural events, and meetings of government boards and committees
  • Public service announcements (PSAs) of government-sponsored events and services
  • Informational or instructional programs on various government agencies and government-sponsored services
  • Public meetings of government policy-making boards/commissions
  • In-service training programs appropriate for public viewing only.
  • Emergency service operations for natural and man-made disasters, weather phenomena, poison prevention, first aid, launches, etc.

PCTV will provide opportunities for local video production students to receive real world television experience through the recording of government meetings, documenting school and local government events, and creating original video programs.

PCTV FACTS

  • The channel was launched on January 2, 2007
  • It occupies the bandwidth on Bright House Networks found on Channel 495.
  • Previous to Jan 2, 2007, Bright House Networks placed EWTN and a Community Bulletin Board on Channel 199 as a temporary public service while keeping the channel in reserve for the City of Palm Coast.
  • Non-Profit/Community Bulletin Board information that falls into a non-city based category is referred to Flagler County Channel 2 (FCTV).

Additional Information - PEG Access Television

Public access television in the United States is a form of Citizen media, similar to Canada's Community channel, Australia's Community television and other models of media created by private citizens.

Due to the 1984 Cable Franchise Policy and Communications Act, US cable companies are required to fund local organizations to provide training and access to media technology and cable distribution on the local cable systems. This legislation was intended to enrich communities with the opportunity to produce community-initiated programming and address local issues and concerns on the electronic medium.

In its conception, Public access television pertained only to the cable television technology of the times, but many Public access organizations now include television, radio and the internet within the spectrum of communications. Public access television is one type of PEG access, short for Public, Educational, and Governmental, the three traditional structures of access within a municipality. History In the United States, Public access is a result of the cable television industry. There was concern within communities as cities began contracting for cable TV service that companies were using public by-ways (such as roads and sidewalks to run cable wires) to make a profit and many advocates believed some form of 'rent' should be paid for their use. Cable companies at the time were greater in number and smaller in size and negotiating this arrangement was eventually confirmed by the FCC and US cable companies were then required to provide a percentage of revenue from the cable TV subscription fees to provide Public access to the cable systems.

Fred W. Friendly

Public access began in 1968 by Fred Friendly, a television advisor to the Ford Foundation and chairman of a New York City advisory task force on CATV and Telecommunications. He wrote a report recommending that cable companies set aside two channels the public could lease for a minor fee. The fee was opposed and later dropped. In July 1971 public access started.

The FCC issued its Third Report and Order in 1972, which required all cable systems in the top 100 U.S. television markets to provide three access channels, one each for educational, local government and public use, where if there was insufficient demand for three in a particular market, the cable companies could offer fewer channels, but at least one, and any group or individual wishing to use the channels was guaranteed at least five minutes free. Also required was for cable companies to provide facilities and equipment with which people could produce shows. 1984 Cable Franchise Policy and Communications Act This act allowed local governments to require PEG channels, barred cable operators from exercising editorial control over content of programs carried on PEG channels, and absolved them from liability for that content.

Congress passed the Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition Act of 1992, which gave the FCC authority to create rules requiring cable operators to prohibit certain shows. The Alliance for Community Media and others brought suit, and in 1996 the U.S. Supreme Court held the law unconstitutional, in part because it required cable operators to act on behalf of the federal government to control expression based on content.

Currently the Alliance for Community Media and others are focusing on operational challenges after new deregulation rules across Texas are directly threatening PEG access. Public access may also be found in the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Denmark, Fiji, South Africa, Austria, Germany, Brazil, and more.

Principles Of PEG Access

Government Access Television

Government access television is a resource of the city to address local municipal programming needs. Often the city or town may use the Government channel to cablecast city council meetings, election programming, local emergency announcements and other events and programs as valued by the local government. PEG access is a government mandate that provides television production equipment, training and airtime on a local cable system so members of the public, educational system, and the government can produce their own shows and televise them to a mass audience.

Municipalities must take initiative and petition the cable operator to provide the funding for PEG access as laid out by law, but municipalities may also choose to take no action and will instead keep the franchise fees in a general fund. A municipality may also choose to allow Governmental access but not Public access or may replace it with Governmental access or may take away Public access altogether, depending on the disposition of the local government or its voters.

Municipalities have a broad spectrum of franchise agreements (a government-granted monopoly) with cable television service providers. Depending on the size of the community and their contractual agreement the PEG and LO channels may take many forms. Large communities often have a separate organization for each PEG type, smaller communities may have a single organization that manages all three. Because each organization will develop its own policies and procedures, constituent services differ greatly between communities.

Educational Access Television

Educational access is the institution set aside for fulfilling the needs of the educational departments and organizations within the municipality. Educational access channels may be associated with a specific school, school district(s) or even private organizations that are contracted to operate the access station for the city.

Educational access centers usually operate a cable channel on the local cable system and often include elements and principle that echo Public access in terms of training and resources. Many school media and video training programs are based in the Educational Access centers. Programming distributed by these centers ranges from student or parent produced media to coverage of local school functions and bodies (such as the School Council or Committee). There are a number of notable Educational access organizations that produce programming for a national audience and experiences a very broad distribution.

Public Access Television

In the United States, Public access is a result of the cable television industry. There was concern within communities as cities began contracting for cable TV service that companies were using public by-ways (such as roads and sidewalks to run cable wires) to make a profit and many advocates believed some form of 'rent' should be paid for their use. Cable companies at the time were greater in number and smaller in size and negotiating this arrangement was eventually confirmed by the FCC and US cable companies were then required to provide a percentage of revenue from the cable TV subscription fees to provide Public access to the cable systems.

Public access television channels may be run by public grassroots groups or individuals, private non-profits or city organizations and policies and regulations are subject to their own ordinances and community standards.

Services available at public access organizations are often low cost or free of charge, with an inclusive, content neutral, first-come, first-served, free speech ideology.

Portions of the above are reprinted courtesy of Wikipedia

Tom Hanson
Video Production Coordinator
City Manager's Office
Phone : (386) 986-2485
Office : City Hall
160 Lake Avenue
Palm Coast, FL 32164

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